ARTICLES

 

 

 

100 YEARS AGO NEAR TUMBLER RIDGE

In 1914 Samuel Prescott Fay led a party of five men and twenty horses on a scientific expedition from Jasper to Hudson’s Hope. In doing so he passed through what is now the Tumbler Ridge area... More…

 

 

100 YEARS AGO NEAR TUMBLER RIDGE: OCTOBER 8, 1914: GWILLIM LAKE


In 1914 Samuel Prescott Fay led a party of five men and twenty horses on a scientific expedition from Jasper to Hudson’s Hope. On October 5th he passed below what is now Tumbler Ridge. Camped out the next night, near what is now known as Bullmoose Marshes, his party heard the blows of an axe. Next morning they met Neilsen, the Danish trapper responsible for the noise... More…

 

 

THE GOLDEN SUMMER OF 2014 IN TUMBLER RIDGE

The ability of the Tumbler Ridge area to keep on delivering new palaeontological discoveries each year is remarkable. The Golden Summer of 2014 reinforces this perception when presented in list form... More…

 

 

THE MONKMAN PASS ROUTE – AN IDEA WHOSE TIME HAS COME AGAIN?

Living in a Global Geopark means not just enjoying the rocks and fossils, but being connected to the land and appreciating how its history has shaped us, then turning those connections into something positive for the community and region... More…

 

 

TUMBLER RIDGE, WORLD WARS I AND II, AND PLACE NAMES

In 1914 Samuel Prescott Fay led a party of five men and twenty horses on a scientific expedition from Jasper to Hudson’s Hope. On October 5th they passed below what is now Tumbler Ridge. Camped out the next night, near what is now known as Bullmoose Marshes, his party heard the blows of an axe. Next morning they met Nielsen, the Danish trapper responsible for the noise. It was a meeting that would change their lives.In 1914 Samuel Prescott Fay led a party of five men and twenty horses on a scientific expedition from Jasper to Hudson’s Hope... More…

 

 

RE-ENACTING WHAT OCCURRED A CENTURY AGO NEAR TUMBLER RIDGE

Three recent articles in Tumbler Ridge News have celebrated the centennial of the 1914 Samuel Prescott Fay expedition and the beginning of our written history. Fay led a party of five men and twenty horses on a scientific and exploratory expedition from Jasper to Hudson’s Hope, passing through what is now the Tumbler Ridge area. These articles have allowed us to enjoy Fay's exploits and achievements in armchair fashion, as we considered his century-ago arrivals, descriptions and photos of Kinuseo Falls, the Big Flat (Tumbler Ridge) and Gwillim Lake... More…

 

 

UNCOVERING OUR HISTORY, ONE PHOTO AT A TIME

As with all Global Geoparks, the Tumbler Ridge is about a lot more than just the rocks. It is about how they have affected our history and who we are, and in turn the effects we have had on them. Our history, especially that of the early surveyors and explorers, is therefore of great importance... More…

 

 

THE TUMBLER RIDGE GLOBAL GEOPARK: WHERE TO FROM HERE?

On September 22nd our Tumbler Ridge Global Geopark was officially designated by the Global Geoparks Network, supported by UNESCO, at the 6th International UNESCO Conference on Global Geoparks in Saint John, New Brunswick. We are one of 111 worldwide, the second in Canada and North America, and the first in the West. Elsewhere in the world, such status has brought with it many diversification, economic, cultural and educational benefits. There are also the intangible benefits that lie in reconnecting people with the Earth and their heritage. How do we work towards achieving all of this in Tumbler Ridge?... More…

 

 

YET ANOTHER CREEK, YET ANOTHER TRACKWAY

That process became more complex and exciting in 2011, after a guide-outfitter reported tracks way into the mountains, in rocks much older than those around Tumbler Ridge or in the coal mines. A whole new series of canyons and summits needed to be systematically explored for tracks. The results have included the spectacular trackways on a huge vertical surface in Dinosaur Gorge, some of the oldest known bird trackways in “Tim’s Creek”, and, as reported in Tumbler Ridge News in August, new tracks in what came to be called Emperor Creek (so named because of its relation to the top runners in the Emperor’s Challenge)... More…